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Email scam reported | Jackson Hole Radio

The Sublette County Sheriff’s office is reporting that they have received multiple reports of a new email scam. This new scam claims to be and appears to be Norton Anti-virus.

They claim that your “card” has been charged anywhere between $200 and $400, and you need to call to rectify the account with them. Those who have called the number found the scammers are attempting to gain remote access to their computer to “fix the issues”.

 

When the scam victims didn’t agree to that, the scammers became belligerent and hung up the phone, which is a sure sign of a scam.

The Sheriff’s Department cautions, always double check with companies directly to ensure legitimacy of claims such as these, and exercise caution as scammers in recent years are getting more and more clever to look legitimate to gain access to credit cards or computers

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Mehul Choksi fears that he might be coerced, kidnapped again and taken to Guyana

Fugitive diamantaire and PNB scam accused Mehul Choksi is fearful that he could be kidnapped again and may be taken to Guyana. Choksi told news agency ANI that he was taken away from Guyana in an unlawful and illegal manner.

“I may be coerced and kidnapped once again, and taken to Guyana, where there is a strong Indian presence, which may be utilised to spirit me away in an unlawful and illegal manner,” Choksi said. He added that he is currently confined to his house in Antigua and that his poor health does not allow him to move much.

“I’m seeking help for the disastrous state of my mental health as I am consumed by constant fear, numbed by the shock of my experiences in the past few months. I am unable to step outside my house despite my doctors’ recommendations and I seek to avoid the limelight at all costs now. My poor health doesn’t allow me to go and do anything,” he further told the news agency.

He added that his lawyers are fighting cases in Antigua and Dominica and that he has complete faith that he will emerge victorious as he is an Antiguan citizen who was allegedly kidnapped, abducted and taken against his will. “It is a matter of the record the extent to which certain governments are willing to go to secure my presence, but I repose full faith in the legal systems of commonwealth countries and I’m sure that justice will prevail in the end,” Choksi said in a veiled attack against the ruling dispensation in India.

The diamantaire, who is…

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Cyber-Forensics.net’s new chargeback assistance program to help online scam victims

Cyber-Forensics.net

Cyber Forensic Specialist

Cyber Forensic Specialist

Chargeback assistance program: A ray of hope for online scam victims- Cyber-Forensics.net joins the fight

CHEYENNE, WYOMING, UNITED STATES, November 29, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Losing money in an online scam can take a severe mental and financial toll on the victim. Trying to navigate the chargeback process without any expertise makes it harder to recover money because, in most cases, the victim doesn’t have the proper knowledge and information to get the money back.

Chargeback assistance programs are designed to help online scam victims to make the chargeback process easier. The experts’ precise understanding of how to get money back aligned with specific tools necessary is already being applauded by many victims.

While talking about the newly launched program, Timothy Benson, a chief analyst at Cyber-Forensics.net, said,” It is better for online scam victims to contact a chargeback company because trying to do it all by oneself with no expertise could permanently damage chances of success. Free consultation can provide both solace and a better strategy to get the hard earned money back.”

Cyber-Forensics.net, an industry leader in providing cyber-forensics services, has recently launched a new chargeback assistance program for online scam victims.

How does Chargebacks Assistance work?

A chargeback is the payment amount returned to a debit or credit…

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Sydney man charged over SMS phishing scam

Australian Federal Police investigators have charged a 38-year-old Sydney man for stealing more than $100,000 in an illegal SMS phishing scam.

The AFP arrested the man at a premises near his home in the Sydney suburb of Ryde on Wednesday, 24 November 2021, and charged him over the alleged theft of more than $100,000 from the banks and telecommunications accounts of more than 450 victims.

The 38-year-old was refused bail and remanded in custody to next appear at Hornsby Local Court on 20 January 2021, charged with three offences.

Phishing is the fraudulent practice of sending SMS and emails claiming to be from reputable companies (such as banks or phone providers) to try and convince victims to reveal personal information, such as passwords and credit card numbers.

The investigation began in September 2021, when the AFP obtained information about suspicious website registrations suspected of being used to phish customers of Australian telecommunications providers and financial institutions.

It will be alleged the man used these webpages to lure Australian victims to enter their personal information, which he would subsequently use to access their telephone accounts, bank accounts and create new accounts without their knowledge.

Police will allege this particular scam started in 2018 and targeted customers of the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, National Australia Bank and Telstra, among others.

The AFP has worked with Commonwealth Bank of Australia, National Australia Bank and…

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A new gift card scam could affect Mississauga and Brampton residents

Published November 28, 2021 at 2:45 pm

If you’re going to be buying gift cards for the holidays, be careful where you buy them.

A local resident recently reported buying a $100 Winners gift card at a Shoppers Drug Mart location — but when attempting to use the card a week later, all of the money on it was already gone.

The cause: Scammers who take photos of the bar codes on unattended gift cards, allowing them to download it onto their phone or computer.

When the gift card is activated it shows up on the scammer’s device, allowing them to shop with it online.

The resident says they tried to contact the store and their credit card provider for support, but was told by both that they could not help with the issue.

As scammers can target any store’s gift cards like this, it’s advised to only buy gift cards from stores that don’t leave the cards out unattended.

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State cybersecurity coordinator helps even little folks ward off online bad guys

Published: 11/28/2021 1:00:40 PM

Modified: 11/28/2021 1:00:11 PM

Let’s say you live in Canterbury and get an email from “townhall@canterburynh.org” warning that your car registration is about to be revoked for nonpayment, and letting you know the town’s convenient online payment system is available. Just click through and use your credit card!

Whether or not you fall for this scam, you almost certainly won’t spot the tell-tale error in the address. The town’s website and email actually end in “canterbury-nh.org,” with a hyphen.

Scammers have long made use of almost-correct email addresses like that to make people think they’re dealing with a reputable source. Most recently, this is how scammers got Peterborough town hall to send them more than $2 million that should have gone to contractors.

If you live in Concord, however, you don’t need to worry about a similar scam from “cityhall@nhconcord.gov” rather than the true “concordnh.gov” for a surprising reason: Those last three letters.

Why? Here’s an explanation from the state’s new cybersecurity coordinator, a position recently created through legislation crafted by U.S. Sen. Maggie Hassan.

“One of the things we’re doing is transitioning municipalities to ‘dot gov’ for top-level domain,” said Rossi. “With dot-gov … you know it’s not a malicious actor who has registered a domain.”

Because becoming a dot-gov website requires a notarized…

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BBB warns of the ‘12 Scams of Christmas’

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (WSFA) – The holiday season is officially here and the Better Business Bureau is warning people to be aware of scammers looking to cash in for Christmas.

The BBB released its naughty list: the “12 Scams of Christmas.”

On the BBB’s naughty list is:

  1. Misleading Social Media Ads: As you scroll through your social media feed, you often see items for sale from a small business. Sometimes the business even claims to support a charity to try to get you to order, or they offer a free trial. BBB Scam Tracker receives reports of people paying for items that they never receive, getting charged monthly for a free trial they never signed up for, or receiving an item that is counterfeit or much different from the one advertised.
  2. Social Media Gift Exchanges: Each holiday season this scheme pops back up, and this year is no different. A newer version of this scam revolves around exchanging bottles of wine; another suggests purchasing $10 gifts online. Another twist asks you to submit your email into a list where participants get to pick a name and send money to strangers to “pay it forward.”
  3. Holiday Apps: Apple’s App Store and Google Play list dozens of holiday-themed apps where children can video chat live with Santa, light the menorah, watch Santa feed live reindeer, track his sleigh on Christmas Eve, or relay their holiday wish lists. Be wary of free apps, as they can sometimes contain more advertising than apps that require a nominal fee. Free apps can also…

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Energy companies, Better Business Bureau warn against utility scams

Published: 11/28/2021 11:05:27 AM

Energy customers are warned not to get burned as temperatures drop this winter.

Eversource and the Better Business Bureau (BBB) expect to see a rise in utility scams during the coming weeks as more scammers become increasingly sophisticated in the way they find unique schemes to take advantage of people.

Scam artists — often sounding legitimate — may threaten to shut off electric service immediately unless instant payment is made, or could claim the customer overpaid a utility bill and request personal bank account or credit card information to give a refund. Penni Conner, executive vice president of customer experience and energy strategy at Eversource, said someone suggesting you pay a bill immediately with a prepaid debit card should be an automatic “red flag.”

“Scammers are constantly changing their tactics to take advantage of unsuspecting customers and prey on people when they feel most vulnerable, like during the holidays,” Conner said in a statement. “That’s why we’re warning customers to beware — if they get a call or text and something doesn’t seem right, don’t panic and don’t pay. And remember, we will never threaten to disconnect service or demand instant payment over the phone.”

Also, “phishing” or “smishing” are increasingly common due to the popularity of smartphone use. Phishing is the practice of sending fraudulent emails purporting to be from reputable…

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‘Geek Squad’ scam has netted more than $22,000 in Niagara County | Crime News

Residents in Niagara County have fallen victim to a new fraud known as the Geek Squad Subscription Scam, the Niagara County Sheriff’s Office said. Victimized residents have lost more than $22,000.

Scammers have been sending people subscription renewal notices from “Geek Squad,” which is an information technology service provided by Best Buy. The scammers want victims to call their phone number and provide sensitive information like credit card numbers, the Sheriff’s Office said.

Sheriff’s officials say residents should look for signs that distinguish scams from the real Best Buy service. For instance, scammers are using a Gmail account instead of a Best Buy email, they said. The scam emails also contain odd grammatical errors and phone numbers that do not match Best Buy’s service lines, which can be found through a simple search engine query.

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‘I know I’m naive!’ Emmerdale star Mark Charnock rages online after falling for scam | Celebrity News | Showbiz & TV

Struggling to contain all of his thoughts and feelings in a single tweet, he came back with another update, this time advising others on what to do if they encounter the same problem.

“The name of the recipient on my credit card isn’t the name on the PayPal funding page,” he explained.

“If this happens to you, it’s worth taking screenshots & reporting it to the police, so you’ve got proof: you can do that here: http://actionfraud.police.uk. Don’t be naive like me!”

Meanwhile, Mark’s Emmerdale character Marlon Dingle will be considerably less sweet than he seems during forthcoming scenes in the soap, when he unleashes his fury following businessman Al’s interference at the pub – the next episode airs tomorrow at 7pm on ITV.

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