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Man who impersonated IRS, DEA to scam Las Cruces man pleads guilty

LAS CRUCES – A man from Columbia pleaded guilty on Monday to scamming a Las Cruces man out of $15,000. 

Julian David Ceballos-Jimenez, 29, of Columbia pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit fraud, a third-degree felony. The charge carried a maximum penalty of three years in prison, two years of parole and a $5,000 fine.

However, Third Judicial District Court Judge Richard Jacquez accepted a plea agreement that eliminated Ceballos-Jimenez’s prison sentence. Instead, Ceballos-Jimenez was required to repay the victim $15,000 and will be removed from the country. 

He was also sentenced to three years of unsupervised probation. 

According to a police affidavit filed by a New Mexico State Police officer, Ceballos-Jimenez tricked a Las Cruces man into sending him a $15,000 wire transfer in 2018. The affidavit said that the victim came forward with the accusations in November 2018. 

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Greg Gutfeld: Award show implosion is one of the great things of the past decade

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

Happy Monday everyone. They say some pictures are worth a thousand words. Well, this one just won’t shut the eff up.

You remember the dress worn by a-list socialist AOC at the ghoulish Met Gala – where the masters sauntered around maskless, while the servants impersonated the gimp from Pulp Fiction.

There hasn’t been a more stark contrast of the powerful and the plebes since I was on the Daily Show.

Each ticket cost $35 grand – yeah, a real working-class event. It must feel great waiting on snobs who paid your yearly income for a night out. 

But the good news is – they also think you’re rife with disease! So you better wear your mask. “Tax the rich,” was the in-your-maskless-face message to the rich white libs, who would like nothing more than for you to think that they agree. Which is why the message was about as edgy as a “world’s greatest grandpa coffee mug.”

But worse: and not that surprising: the designer of AOC’s dress happily ignores her own message. A New York Post exclusive portrays Aurora James as a “notorious tax deadbeat with unpaid debts dogging her in multiple states.” It’s true: Wesley Snipes has a better reputation with the IRS.

She has six IRS tax liens totaling 103-thousand bucks on her parent company, and a 17 grand fine for failing to carry workman’s comp. That parent company sounds more like a deadbeat dad.

She faces legal challenges for nonpayment of worker benefits. The company currently owns…

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German Startup Driving Around Autonomous Vehicle Hurdles

Despite the concept of autonomous cars suggesting a seamless, hands-free driving experience as far back as the late 1950s, only the peripheral technologies have made their way into the real world. Our ancestors would have marveled at the video displays, powertrains, and navigation systems available today. But the 21st century concept of “mobility” has also turned out to be a bit of a scam.

Formerly a catch-all term for autonomous transportation, the phrase has been redefined by the industry to pertain to subscription fees, over-the-air updates, digitally affixing your credit card information to the vehicle, and just about any present-day feature it’s interested in selling. Meanwhile, the self-driving programs that kicked off the would-be renaissance have been stagnating as companies cannot quite figure out how to teach a car to successfully assume all of the duties of a human driver. However there’s a German startup that’s attempting to circumvent those obstacles by employing digital chauffeurs working from far-off locations.

At a glance, Vay appears to have all the hallmarks of a self-driving vehicle firm. It uses a minimalist logo, language that borrows obnoxiously from marketing agencies, and is heavily dependent upon same hardware all autonomous vehicles currently need to function. But how it’s utilizing those on-board systems is very different. Rather than hiring an army of engineers and programmers in an attempt to teach an automobile how to drive…

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Congress needs to increase my taxes

President Joe Biden and others have proposed monumental steps toward making our tax system fairer to help fund universal pre-K, free community college, national paid family and medical leave, and other critical priorities. The new revenue could also help fight the mental health and addiction epidemics in our country, which have killed over 840,000 people in the past 20 years and have no vaccine cure.

But reforming our tax system should not just be about paying for major programs. It should be about making sure billionaires, corporations and, frankly, people like me pay their fair share. Tax fairness should be a goal in and of itself.

The good news is there is no shortage of good ideas to make our tax code more equitable.

First, we need to tax capital gains for wealthy Americans just like ordinary income. Coffee shop baristas pay taxes on their earned income every year. If they don’t, the IRS will be on their doorstep. But wealthy investors can defer taxes for decades on money they make in the stock market, real estate or some other investment.

But the real scam is a giant loophole in our tax code known as stepped-up basis. This allows wealthy Americans to avoid paying any taxes on their investment gains for their entire life if they keep it until they die and pass it along to their children. More than 60 percent of the wealth of billionaires, nearly $3 trillion dollars, goes untaxed because of this loophole. While every other American pays a tax on their income, the rich…

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FBI updates Hall Co scam arrests – WGAU

Hall County deputies arrested two New York men accused of trying to scam local couples out of thousands of dollars in a phone scam. The sheriff’s office is now working to identify other potential victims.

Brandon Massey, 23, and Jamal Davis, 28, were arrested as they arrived to the house of an elderly North Hall County couple to collect $12,000 in cash that they were scamming them out of, according to the sheriff’s office.

Deputies say that in this scam, the scammer will call a potential victim and tell them that a family member, typically one of their grandchildren, is in legal trouble and that they need cash to secure bond or pay a legal fee.

The scammer will request more than $10,000 in cash and then send one or two “representatives” to the victim’s home to collect the money.

When officers arrived to arrest Massey and Davis, Massey tried driving away, but his car was blocked in by patrol vehicles.

Massey is being charged with exploitation of an elder person, fleeing/attempting to elude a police officer, obstruction of an officer and reckless driving.

Davis is being charged with exploitation of an elderly person.

After the arrests, Hall County investigators warned other law enforcement agencies across Georgia to be on the lookout for scammers.

Authorities in Walton, Fannin and Hart counties were able to identify similar scammers in their areas and arrest suspects as they came to collect money.

Investigators later identified a lead scammer who makes the calls and…

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2 men arrested for trying to steal $12K from Hall County senior couple in phone scam – WSB-TV Channel 2

HENRY COUNTY, Ga. — Hall County deputies arrested two New York men accused of trying to scam local couples out of thousands of dollars in a phone scam. The sheriff’s office is now working to identify other potential victims.

Brandon Massey, 23, and Jamal Davis, 28, were arrested as they arrived to the house of an elderly North Hall County couple to collect $12,000 in cash that they were scamming them out of, according to the sheriff’s office.

[DOWNLOAD: Free WSB-TV News app for alerts as news breaks]

Deputies say that in this scam, the scammer will call a potential victim and tell them that a family member, typically one of their grandchildren, is in legal trouble and that they need cash to secure bond or pay a legal fee.

The scammer will request more than $10,000 in cash and then send one or two “representatives” to the victim’s home to collect the money.

When officers arrived to arrest Massey and Davis, Massey tried driving away, but his car was blocked in by patrol vehicles.

TRENDING STORIES:

Massey is being charged with exploitation of an elder person, fleeing/attempting to elude a police officer, obstruction of an officer and reckless driving.

Davis is being charged with exploitation of an elderly person.

After the arrests, Hall County investigators warned other law enforcement agencies across Georgia to be on the lookout for scammers.

Authorities in Walton, Fannin and Hart counties were able to identify similar scammers in their areas and arrest suspects as they…

Read more…

2 men arrested for trying to steal $12K from Hall County senior couple in phone scam – 95.5 WSB

HENRY COUNTY, Ga. — Hall County deputies arrested two New York men accused of trying to scam local couples out of thousands of dollars in a phone scam. The sheriff’s office is now working to identify other potential victims.

Brandon Massey, 23, and Jamal Davis, 28, were arrested as they arrived to the house of an elderly North Hall County couple to collect $12,000 in cash that they were scamming them out of, according to the sheriff’s office.

[DOWNLOAD: Free WSB-TV News app for alerts as news breaks]

Deputies say that in this scam, the scammer will call a potential victim and tell them that a family member, typically one of their grandchildren, is in legal trouble and that they need cash to secure bond or pay a legal fee.

The scammer will request more than $10,000 in cash and then send one or two “representatives” to the victim’s home to collect the money.

When officers arrived to arrest Massey and Davis, Massey tried driving away, but his car was blocked in by patrol vehicles.

TRENDING STORIES:

Massey is being charged with exploitation of an elder person, fleeing/attempting to elude a police officer, obstruction of an officer and reckless driving.

Davis is being charged with exploitation of an elderly person.

After the arrests, Hall County investigators warned other law enforcement agencies across Georgia to be on the lookout for scammers.

Authorities in Walton, Fannin and Hart counties were able to identify similar scammers in their areas and arrest suspects as they…

Read more…

3 New Scams Targeting COVID-19 Relief Payments – CBS Dallas / Fort Worth

DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM)IRS criminal investigators are warning Americans to watch out for COVID-19 payment scams.

“(The government) has put out a lot of mechanisms to help people financially through the pandemic and now those mechanisms are being exploded by criminals,” said IRS Special Agent in Charge Mark Pearson.

READ MORE: Rowlett Restaurant Owner Explains No-Mask Policy After Asking Family To Leave

Pearson said with each round of federal stimulus checks has come a spike in reported scams.

“The volume is unbelievable,” he said. “This is historically the greatest amount of fraud we’ve ever seen.”

Here are three new COVID-19 relief scams to look out for:

#1 FTC email scam

Investigators say the scam starts with an email that looks to be from Joe Simons of the Federal Trade Commission.

The email says you’re getting COVID-19 relief money and includes a fake certificate from the Treasury Department.

If you reply, they say you have to pay taxes before you get your money. That should be a red flag.

However, to convince you, they send a fake letter from the IRS.

If you pay, the scammers push it further. They say you now must pay the State Department for a certificate that proves the funds are not related to any terrorist activity.

#2 Stimulus check text scam

The text message says, “You have received a direct deposit of $1,200 (or $600) from COVID-19 TREAS FUND. Further action is required to accept this payment into your account. Continue here to accept this…

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Ransomware attacks on the rise

GREEN BAY, Wis. (WBAY) – Multiple people – including the Wisconsin Attorney General, the FBI, and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) – say Wisconsin businesses are targets of ransomware attacks.

Reports of the attacks have exploded during the pandemic, with cyberthieves locking computers, and hackers holding businesses hostage. The cyber criminals demand immediate payment to release data critical for a business.

So far this year, the FBI has received 41 ransomware reports in Wisconsin. That’s compared to 30 reports in all of 2020.

Josh Kaul, the Wisconsin Attorney General, is warning companies they should take precautions now.

“The more that people are aware of this danger and take steps to prevent it the less likely those criminals are to succeed,” said Kaul.

In order to help educate businesses, the Better Business Bureau (BBB) of Wisconsin – as well as the FBI, IRS, and FTC – came together in a webinar to explain how cybercriminals attack.

“It can happen to anyone, not just large companies, even government agencies are now immune. A couple of months ago, a ransomware attack compromised the systems of the Illinois State Office of the Attorney General in my state, taking them entirely off line for several weeks,” said Todd Kossow, the Director of the Midwest Region of the FTC.

The attacks often come in the form of phishing e-mail.

In a business e-mail scam, also known as a BEC, one wrong click can cost a company.

“In a simple bank robbery, or even a robbery…

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‘Smishing’: the rising threat for business owners that brings scams to smartphones | US small business

You’ve heard of ransomware? Now you’ve got to worry about “smishing”.

Smishing is a relatively new form of cyberattack that’s threatening millions of consumers and small businesses around the world. Smishing is a form of “phishing” using SMS or text messages instead of email messages to entice recipients to click on phoney links that draws them to sites where either personal information is exchanged or malware is unknowingly downloaded.

Many of my smaller clients and their employees have already seen these messages on their mobile phones. They usually come in the form of a text that appears to come from a bank, a utility company, a government agency (such as the IRS), a delivery service or some other seemingly credible source. Fake messages related to Covid testing and contact tracing have also contributed to the rise in this activity.

These messages sometimes ask the recipient to confirm payment information or other financial details. Or recipients are asked to click on a link or respond to a question. This kind of activity also alerts the hacker that the phone number is credible and active, which then opens them up to receiving malware or compromising their personal information.

How big a problem is this? In 2020, according to the FBI, this new form of attack cost Americans more than $50m, and those costs are expected to rise significantly. Cybersecurity company Proofpoint says that mobile phishing attacks in North America increased more than 300% in the third…

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