This is the “couch” received by a second-grade teacher after she clicked on a Facebook ad. The firm told her she wasn’t eligible for a refund unless she mailed it back to China at her expense.

When we talk about Facebook’s bad behavior, it’s easy to get bogged down in the details. Don’t. We should focus more on the outright fraud enabled by its platforms.

There’s been near constant talk about Facebook’s misbehavior lately, reaching a new crescendo after whistleblower Frances Haugen told Congress the firm knowingly makes software that hurts kids.  But as Haugen herself pointed out this week, regulators risk talking themselves into circles as they get bogged down in the details about how to react to Facebook’s various transgressions.  Debate on Section 230 could easily last into the next century, I think. And Facebook’s role in the 2016 election? Well, that’s destined to fill up talk radio show hours with never-ending prattle.

That’s why I wish there were much more focus on the outright fraud that Facebook enables. The case there is much more clear, as a the pillowcase-couch above suggests.

Facebook’s advertising platform got some of the attention it deserves this week after a story by Donie O’Sullivan at CNN showed the social media giant has taken payment for anti-vaxx ads, including a set that compared the U.S. vaccine program to the Holocaust. Facebook has publicly taken the stance that it has not contributed to anti-vaccine sentiment in…

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