IRS scams involve criminals impersonating IRS agents, other government employees or debt collectors over the phone, online or via the mail in an effort to trick you into sending them money for taxes, penalties or fees you don’t actually owe.

People lose millions of dollars a year due to IRS scams. Don’t be one of them. Here’s a list of recent IRS scams, tips on how to spot one and (perhaps) how to get some revenge.

Have any of these happened to you?

1. ‘We recalculated your tax refund and you need to fill out this form’

These scam emails display the IRS logo and use subject lines such as “Tax Refund Payment” or “Recalculation of your tax refund payment.” It asks people to click a link and provide their Social Security numbers, birthday, address, driver’s license number and other personal information in order to submit a fake form to allegedly claim their refund.

2. ‘You need to pay a small fee to get your stimulus check’

This is a growing scam related to the government’s ongoing response to the coronavirus, the Federal Trade Commission warns. Many Americans will qualify for a stimulus check, but the government (including the IRS) does not require anyone to pay anything to receive the money.

3. ‘We’re calling from the FDIC and we need your bank information’

The Federal Depository Insurance Corporation insures bank deposits so that consumers won’t lose all of their money if a bank fails. But it does not send unsolicited correspondence asking for money, sensitive personal…

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