The Daily Star, Lebanon’s oldest English-language newspaper, has become the latest casualty of the country’s economic meltdown, bringing its nearly 70-year run to a close. Blackouts and gas shortages are now routine. As the ranks of independent journalists in Lebanon grow ever thinner, it will only become harder to hold the corrupt political class who left the country destitute accountable.

During my four years at the Daily Star, both the paper and the country rode a wave of prosperity and optimism. Lebanon saw itself as the next Dubai. Now, it depends on humanitarian aid.

The paper recruited me in 2000, shortly after I received my bachelor’s degree from the American University of Beirut (AUB) and began a graduate program. I was also editing Outlook, AUB’s student publication. The Daily Star made a point of scouting for talent and launched the careers of a generation of journalists. Kim Ghattas, author of a bestselling book on former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, published her earliest articles in the Daily Star. So did Michael Karam, a prominent wine writer who now lives in London.

The Daily Star, Lebanon’s oldest English-language newspaper, has become the latest casualty of the country’s economic meltdown, bringing its nearly 70-year run to a close. Blackouts and gas shortages are now routine. As the ranks of independent journalists in Lebanon grow ever thinner, it will only become harder to hold the corrupt political class…

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