NASHVILLE, TN –The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reported a new scam that uses social media to defraud consumers. Emergency broadband program impersonators offer a free device and Internet service in exchange for money or personal information. Don’t believe them. While there are programs to help people to connect during the pandemic, they do not cost money to enroll. 

The FTC posted an August alert about fake stem cell therapies. There is a lot of misinformation out there about the coronavirus and stem cell products, too. But those have not been shown to be safe or effective for most ailments, and could actually be harmful.

If you get an email from FTC Chairwoman Lina M. Khan telling you she wants to send you COVID-19 relief money, it’s fake. Don’t respond with your name, address, or date of birth. The IRS sends those checks, not the FTC. And your boss didn’t email you asking for a gift card to pay for the office party. Phone your boss instead and ask him or her how you could contribute.

After Nashville’s deadly tornadoes in March 2020, scammers in North Nashville offered to clean up, replace roofs, or rebuild houses. There were speculators offering to buy damaged homes for cash. The FTC says: don’t believe any promises that aren’t in writing; don’t pay by wire transfer; never pay in cash; don’t make the final payment until the work is done and you are satisfied. 

When natural disasters strike like the August floods in Waverly,…

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