HAVE you heard of “cancel culture”? Merriam Webster defines the phrase as the practice or tendency of engaging in mass canceling as a way of expressing disapproval and exerting social pressure. An example of that would be the mass withdrawal of support from public figures or celebrities who have done things that aren’t socially accepted. This practice of “canceling” often occurs on social media platforms such as Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook. While “canceling” may have its merits, it is often abused in social media. It should be stopped.

But there’s another cancel-movement that others may not yet be aware of but which we need to expunge — the “cancel order” scam. “Alert! You have been charged P5,000 for an online purchase. To cancel your order, immediately click the link below.” And with a single click, your hard-earned money goes down the drain.

Remember that banks will never ask you to click on any link via email, let alone call you, to cancel your transactions. In BPI, 55 percent of the reported phishing attacks come from online and mobile app users aged 35-59, followed by users aged below 35 comprising the 33 percent. The remaining 12 percent comes from users aged 59 above. The biggest target, which is the age group 35-59, comprise those who usually have investments and higher salaries…

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