The IRS isn’t exactly modern.

If it needs to get in touch with a taxpayer, it sends a letter — not an email, not a phone call, and definitely not a message over social media. Especially in cases of tax fraud.

So when I got a voicemail around tax day a few years ago admonishing me for supposed issues with the tax return I filed, I knew it had to be the latest IRS phone scam.

A phone number from Washington, DC, called me and left a voicemail when I didn’t answer.

It was an automated message that said:

“Time sensitive and urgent … we found that there was a fraud and misconduct on your tax which you are hiding from federal government. This needs to be rectified immediately, so please return the call as soon as you receive the message.”

It told me to return the call to the same DC-area phone number displayed on my caller ID. It’s pretty clear this was a scam call, if not for the simple reason that the caller did not identify themselves as someone from the IRS. Also, as previously mentioned, the IRS prefers snail mail.

Unfortunately, this wasn’t the last time I’d encounter an attempted scam artist. I get robo-calls fairly regularly…

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