“These scammers, they’re looking for that one in 50 — that’s enough for their day, and they’ve done what they needed to do.” — Chris Hall, community affairs specialist with the Charlotte County Sheriff’s Office

HONEY, YOUR JUST texted me saying your“ BANK debit card is locked!” My husband said this as he walked into our home office carrying his cellphone, a look of concern on his face. He must have been concerned if he left his NFL game that was playing on the TV; I never see him on Sunday afternoons.

“Yeah, I got a couple of those texts, too, but just delete it,” I replied. He still looked worried. “Think about it — how did my bank get your telephone number? I put your name on my account for an emergency, but I don’t recall giving them your phone number. Does the message have a 725 area code number to tap?”

“Yes, it does,” he said.

“So did the ones I got,” I replied. “My bank is based in Cincinnati, but that’s not a Cinci area code. I Googled it — 725 is Las Vegas.”

Laughter cracked the concern on his face. The mention of Sin City as the place the messages wanted us to call was what finally convinced him that the texts were a scam.

A pre-paid mobile phone that Florida Weekly purchased for a robocall-monitoring experiment received a high number of scam robotexts over the month of September. COURTESY PHOTOS

A pre-paid mobile phone that Florida Weekly purchased for a robocall-monitoring experiment received a high number of scam robotexts over the month of September. COURTESY PHOTOS

Normally I wouldn’t tell a personal anecdote in a news article, much less open with it. But this incident…

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